PLASTERING SERVICES ALYELSBURY

Aylesbury Plastering - Domestic - And - Commercial

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Supersmooth Walls And Mirror Finish Halls in Aylesbury

Professional Plastering By Dedicated Teams .

Aylesbury Plastering For Beautiful Homes

Contracts Can Be Undertaken On Behalf Of Builders Or Home Improvement Companies Or For Commercial Or Domestic Customers

We Can Work To Your Own Specification Or Complete The Job Using Our Plastering Skills

Phone Plastering Services Aylesbury Free On 0800 8818103

Plastering Services Aylesbury also undertake exterior rendering and pointing

For Beautiful Homes In Aylesbury

Contract Fitting Designer Coving and Specialised Plaster Work

New Ideas for Conservatories Kitchens and Utility rooms

Specialised Plastering Services for Retail Premises Pubs and Clubs

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Aylesbury is the county town of Buckinghamshire in south east England. In the 2001 census the Aylesbury Urban Area[1], which includes Bierton, Fairford Leys, Stoke Mandeville and Watermead, had a population of 69,021, which included 56,392 for the Aylesbury civil parish. Aylesbury is part of the London commuter belt. Contents [hide] * 1 History * 2 Modern Aylesbury * 3 Architecture * 4 Education * 5 Administration * 6 Trade and industry * 7 Transport o 7.1 Road o 7.2 Bus o 7.3 Rail o 7.4 Cycling Demonstration town * 8 Notable residents * 9 Popular culture * 10 Geography * 11 Twin towns * 12 Places of interest * 13 Gallery * 14 See also * 15 References * 16 External links [edit] History The town name is Anglo-Saxon, though excavations in the town centre in 1985 found an Iron Age hillfort dating from around 650BC. The town is sited on an outcrop of Portlandian limestone which accounts for its prominent position in the surrounding landscape, which is largely clay. Aylesbury was a major market town in Anglo-Saxon times, famous in addition as the burial place of Saint Osyth, whose shrine attracted pilgrims. The Early English parish church of St. Mary (with many later additions) may be built over the remains of a Saxon crypt. At the Conquest, the king took the manor of Aylesbury for himself, and it is listed as a royal manor in the Domesday Book, 1086. Market Square, Aylesbury. Market Square, Aylesbury. In 1450 a religious institution called the Guild of St Mary was founded in Aylesbury by John Kemp, Archbishop of York. Known popularly as the Guild of Our Lady it became a meeting place for local dignitaries and a hotbed of political intrigue. The Guild was influential in the final outcome of the Wars of the Roses. Its premises at the Chantry in Church Street, Aylesbury, are still there, though today the site is occupied mainly by almshouses. Aylesbury was declared the county town of Buckinghamshire in 1529 by King Henry VIII: Aylesbury Manor was among the many properties belonging to Thomas Boleyn the father of Anne Boleyn and it is rumoured that the change was made by the king in order to curry favour with the holders of the manor. (Previously the county town of Buckinghamshire was Buckingham).

 

Plasterwork is one of the most ancient of building techniques. Evidence shows that the dwellings of primitive man were erected in a simple fashion with sticks and plastered with mud. The pyramids in Egypt contain plasterwork executed at least four thousand years ago, probably much earlier, and yet hard and durable, at the present time. From recent discoveries it has been ascertained that the tools of the plasterer of that time were practically identical in design, shape and purpose with those used today. For their finest work, the Egyptians used a plaster made from calcined gypsum just like plaster of Paris of the present time, and their methods of plastering on reeds resemble in every way our lath, plaster, float and set work. Hair was introduced to strengthen the material, and the whole finished somewhat under an inch thick.

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