PLASTERING SERVICES HARLOW

Harlow Plastering - Domestic - And - Commercial

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Supersmooth Walls And Mirror Finish Halls in Harlow

Professional Plastering By Dedicated Teams .

Harlow Plastering For Beautiful Homes

Contracts Can Be Undertaken On Behalf Of Builders Or Home Improvement Companies Or For Commercial Or Domestic Customers

We Can Work To Your Own Specification Or Complete The Job Using Our Plastering Skills

Phone Plastering Services Harlow Free On 0800 8818103

Plastering Services Harlow also undertake exterior rendering and pointing

For Beautiful Homes In Harlow

Contract Fitting Designer Coving and Specialised Plaster Work

New Ideas for Conservatories Kitchens and Utility rooms

Specialised Plastering Services for Retail Premises Pubs and Clubs

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Your Personal Contact at Plastering Services Harlow
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PLASTERING SEVICES HARLOW Acknowledge Wikipedia for the following information

Etymology The name Harlow derives from the Anglo-Saxon words 'here' and 'hlaw', meaning "army hill", probably to be identified with Mulberry Hill, which was used as the moot or meeting place for the district. The original village, mentioned in the Domesday book, developed as a typical rural community around what is now known as Old Harlow, with many of its buildings still standing. [edit] Early history There was a Roman fort or settlement dating from around the 3rd century. Archaeological excavations during the 1970s unearthed a Roman temple and a mosaic floor, itself built on top of an earlier Iron Age temple. The oldest finds in the town were axe heads made in about 6000 BC.[3] [edit] The new town The new town was built after World War II to ease overcrowding in London at the same time as the similar orbital developments of Basildon, Stevenage and Hemel Hempstead. The master plan for the new town was drawn up in 1947 by Sir Frederick Gibberd.[4] The development incorporated the market town of Harlow, now a neighbourhood known as Old Harlow, and the villages of Great Parndon, Latton, Tye Green, Potter Street, Churchgate Street, Little Parndon and Netteswell. The town is divided into neighbourhoods, each self supporting with their own shopping precincts and community facilities. Harlow has one of the most extensive cycle track networks in the country, connecting all areas of the town to the town centre and industrial areas. The cycle network is composed mostly of the original pre-new town roads. The town centre is notable being the location of Britain's first pedestrian precinct,[5] and first residential tower block, The Lawn,[6][7] constructed in 1951; it is now a Grade II listed building. From 1894 to 1955 the Harlow parish formed part of the Epping Rural District of Essex.[8] From 1955 to 1974 Harlow was an urban district.[9] The town centre, and many of its neighbourhood shopping facilities have undergone major redevelopment, along with many of the town's original buildings. Most of the town's buildings, built at a time when concrete was widely used in construction, now suffer from conditions relating to this, both practical and aesthetic. Subsequently, many of the original town buildings, including most of its health centres, the Staple Tye shopping centre and many industrial units have been rebuilt. The most notable of these has been the demolition of Gibberd's original town hall, a landmark in the town, and its replacement of a new civic centre and shopping area.

 

Plasterwork is one of the most ancient of building techniques. Evidence shows that the dwellings of primitive man were erected in a simple fashion with sticks and plastered with mud. The pyramids in Egypt contain plasterwork executed at least four thousand years ago, probably much earlier, and yet hard and durable, at the present time. From recent discoveries it has been ascertained that the tools of the plasterer of that time were practically identical in design, shape and purpose with those used today. For their finest work, the Egyptians used a plaster made from calcined gypsum just like plaster of Paris of the present time, and their methods of plastering on reeds resemble in every way our lath, plaster, float and set work. Hair was introduced to strengthen the material, and the whole finished somewhat under an inch thick.

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